Fluidotherapy – Dry Heat

Jersey Shore Hospital recently acquired a Fluidotherapy Double Extremity Unit, used for applying dry heat therapies to patients suffering from a variety of conditions.

Licensed Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant Ruby Stetts administers fluidotherapy to patient Christina Keller.

Licensed Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant Ruby Stetts administers fluidotherapy to patient Christina Keller.

This whirlpool simulation technology provides dry heat  through  the movement of heated cellulose particles. Patients receive thermal massage contact to the extremities with temperatures ranging between 110-123 degrees Fahrenheit.

Dry heat benefits patients by relieving pain and increasing circulation in the hands, wrists, feet and ankles. It improves range of motion and reduces stiffness and localized pain. Occupational and physical therapists can also provide range of motion and stretching treatments simultaneously while patients are receiving dry heat therapy.

The sensation of this treatment is similar to a mini-whirlpool, but without water or wetness. “Fluidotherapy adds a new dimension to our hands-on treatment approach,” said Brian Haas, Director of Rehabilitation Services at Jersey Shore Hospital. “This technology allows us to offer a new treatment method for patients suffering from common conditions.”

The dry heat massage offers warmth, reduces pain, increases local circulation and also aids in increasing range of motion. Dry heat therapy offers treatment for various conditions such as pain, arthritis, and various injuries or post-operative conditions of the hands, wrists, feet and ankles.

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